Here’s the proof that net neutrality is going to be a factor in the midterms

Image for post
Image for post

Net neutrality is going to be a factor in the midterm elections tomorrow. It’s ridiculous to claim otherwise. The FCC’s repeal of open Internet protections sparked an unprecedented backlash from across the political spectrum. Millions of people spoke out on this issue and they are paying attention to where the candidates stand. A recent poll showed that the majority of voters, regardless of party affiliation, say net neutrality will influence how they vote.

With hours to go before election day, we built a “Net neutrality voter” selfie tool, and we’re flooding the Internet with photos and stories from people across the country who plan to #VoteForNetNeutrality. Thousands have already posted theirs, including hundreds of first time voters from all 50 states. Here’s a sampling:

Image for post
Image for post

First time voter Kali in Missouri: “I rely on net neutrality for my everyday life and so does everyone I know. It’s very clear to me who I should be setting my eyes on to keep net neutrality in place. I’m also a first-time voter and have been encouraging others my age to vote. This topic is very serious to me and my friends.”

Image for post
Image for post

First time voter Sean in Arizona: “In my area there are limited available ISPs, and a revocation of net neutrality could threaten access to all forms of information.”

Image for post
Image for post

Kaitlyn, a voter in Texas: “I grew up in a small town. The internet gave me access to more than I had available in that tiny community. It offered an escape and helped make me who I am. I know that’s true for people all over the world today. It helps connect us. Something that precious should be protected.”

Image for post
Image for post

John, a voter in Alabama: “Always vote net neutrality. Mid term, or not. I tend to have Republican views, but if they continue to make this a partisan issue, I will vote Democrat.”

Image for post
Image for post

First time voter Esmee in California: “I need the internet for my education as well as my social life.”

Image for post
Image for post

Mike, a voter in Colorado: “Net neutrality is the single biggest issue to me this election. Allowing the consumer protection provided by this to be subverted by greedy lobbies in the telecommunications industry will continue the monopolistic destruction of this vital resource. We need net neutrality, and the voters are watching.”

Image for post
Image for post

Kayla, a voter in Georgia: “As an educator, net neutrality is very important for myself and my students to receive the information they need for an accurate and unbiased education.”

Image for post
Image for post

Kevin, a voter in Missouri: “I’m a self employed web developer and entrepreneur. The internet help keep food on the table for my wife and four boys.”

Image for post
Image for post

Alyce is a California voter, and says, “The Internet should be free and open, not subject to fast lanes and corporate greed.”

Image for post
Image for post

First time voter Cypress in Tennessee: “The Internet is the most expansive library of information ever made by humans, and it should be neutral and open to all.”

Image for post
Image for post

First time voter Thomas in Virginia: “I believe net neutrality is very important in protecting the free flow of ideas and information.”

Image for post
Image for post

Kipp, a voter in California: “Women and minorities (like me) have been able to sidestep corporate discrimination by working like MANIACS to build successful online businesses. We don’t want our business opportunities to be sabotaged by the same corporations we’ve walked away from. We’re willing to do the work to be successful — why should a corporation like AT&T get a piece of our pie? It’s NOT okay.”

Image for post
Image for post

Jesse, a voter in Washington: “Taking away net neutrality enables a very small number of companies to effectively censor the Internet. There’s absolutely no good reason to enable Internet service providers to selectively choose what we see and what information matters to us. This is not complex folks. But our rights for free speech and communication with one another are at stake. This matters. Vote.”

Image for post
Image for post

Kelly, a voter in Georgia: “I’m a small business owner, and also a decent human. Net neutrality matters to me!”

Image for post
Image for post

Linda, a voter in Arizona: “As a low income senior citizen I can’t afford rate hikes that will surely come. I also resent the freedom being taken away by big companies that the internet has always fostered. Taking away net neutrality hurts education, small businesses, start ups.”

Image for post
Image for post

Jae is a voter in Mississippi: “I am for net neutrality because as a mother of five I see how vital it is to have an open and unbiased internet to allow people and students to access information and resources that would otherwise be impossible to obtain. Net neutrality is necessary for the purpose of education, free speech and self development. If you eliminate the ability for creative minds and the young innovators to access a free internet, potential world changers may not ever get the opportunity to create and display their genius to the world. Look at Facebook for example and all forms of social media; it changed the way we communicate with loved ones and people across the globe. Let’s DEFEND net neutrality.”

Image for post
Image for post

Jeuss, a voter in North Carolina: It matters to me because it is a symbol of the people’s freedom. It guarantees our internet freedom and stops Internet service providers from abusing their customers.

Image for post
Image for post

Leah, a voter in Utah: “Internet use is critical to education and without net neutrality we will limit the availability of internet usage to many who need it most.”

Image for post
Image for post

Zach, a voter in California: “Proud Gay Republican for net neutrality! Internet should be open and free for all always.”

Image for post
Image for post

George, a voter in Kansas: “Net neutrality will shape the future we live in for genorations. This issue is important to me.”

Image for post
Image for post

Mike, a voter in Illinois: “Without Net Neutrality, we will continue to see poor service and high prices. Why would an ISP want to change that? It’s up to congress to make this change. And Nov is coming, so vote for some congress men and women who will make the change.”

Image for post
Image for post

Lyn, a voter from Illinois: “I am a small-scale content provider serving a niche community. There’s no way I will be able to pay to make sure my site doesn’t get throttled down, and from there, odds are good my fans will get impatient and stop reading. Net neutrality has been vital to my creative voice and preferred role in society.”

Image for post
Image for post

Susan, a voter in Minnesota: “I am a small business owner. Net neutrality is crucial for free enterprise. Big cable wants to take away our freedom and enterprise so than make even more money than they do now. I will vote against any politician who doesn’t support Net Neutrality.”

Image for post
Image for post

Annie, a voter in Maryland: “Net neutrality helps keep us free from government tyranny.”

Image for post
Image for post

Jacob, a voter in Pennsylvania: “Net neutrality should be considered a factor of the first amendment. ISPs shouldn’t be allowed to determine what we see on the internet and should absolutely not be able to throttle users.”

Image for post
Image for post

Spencer, a voter in Arizona: “As an artist, I rely on an open internet to keep in touch with clients and reach out to new ones. Getting rid of net neutrality will make it difficult for me to find work. I vote for net neutrality.”

Image for post
Image for post

Amy, a voter in Illinois: “Net Neutrality is important — get out and VOTE! Please don’t assume your vote doesn’t matter — each and every one count!”

Image for post
Image for post

Kate, a first-time in Wisconsin: “Without Net Neutrality we lose the reason the internet is such a beautiful and diverse place, a place of freedom knowledge. A place that I’ve made irreplaceable friends and learned things I never would have otherwise. To end Net Neutrality is to curb our freedom of speech.”

Image for post
Image for post

Elijah is a voter in Connecticut and says: “I’ve stood up for an open opportunity internet since SOPA and PIPA cause it’s essential for all artists and entertainers like me trying to make it in the digital age. That’s one reason why I’m voting in my 1st midterm ever. I won’t risk losing any chance to protect the values of the internet.”

Image for post
Image for post

Vanessa, a Florida voter: “The right to an unencumbered Internet and the knowledge it gives access to is as fundamental as the right to life, freedom and the pursuit of happiness.”

Image for post
Image for post

James is a first-time voter in California: “I’m a student who needs Net Neutrality to continue for the people who are going through a difficult time.”

Image for post
Image for post

Ben is a voter in Virginia: “Net neutrality matters to me because it represents my right to privacy and my representative’s commitment to my interests over those of ISP corporations.”

Image for post
Image for post

Anjolie is a voter in Colorado and supports net neutrality “because my Internet is my business.”

Written by

We believe there's hardly anything as important as ensuring that our shared future has freedom of expression and creativity at its core.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store